Herbfacts

News: February 2018

GINKGO HELPS BRAIN RECOVER AFTER A STROKE

Doctor holding a sign with the word 'stroke' on it

It’s long been known that ginkgo biloba, an ancient herb from the East, may help boost blood flow to the peripheries and now according to a recent, small Chinese study[i] it may help the brain recover after a stroke.

Half of the study participants, all of who had recently suffered an ischaemic stroke, were given 450mg of ginkgo plus 100mg of aspirin while the other half were given only aspirin. The results showed that those taking the combination dose scored higher in a neuropsychological test on cognitive skills, including memory and reasoning, than those taking just the aspirin.

Speech problems and muscle strength also improved faster. More studies are needed say the researchers, but these early results look promising.

EATING YOUR GREENS COULD HELP WARD OFF DEMENTIA

A selection of green vegetables on a white background

Piling your plate high with salad and leafy greens could keep your brain healthy and even help ward off dementia. So says a recent study[ii] of elderly people which found that those who ate around one serving of leafy greens each day had brains around 10 years younger than those who never or rarely ate green veggies. A serving equalled around 100g of cooked spinach, kale or collard greens.

BRITISH HEART FOUNDATION RECORD-BREAKING ATTEMPT

Headshot of woman holding a red paper heart over one eye

This February, British Heart Foundation (BHF) shops are aiming to break a record for the world’s largest chain of paper hearts (the current record stands at 8,525 paper hearts).[iii] To mark Valentine’s Day a team of BHF supporters will come together to break the chain.

To take part all you have to do is buy a #2 world record love note at the till of your local BHF shop and write your message to share the love with friends or family and hand it back in.

For information on how to look after your heart this February – this year’s heart month – click on Love your Heart.

 

[i] http://svn.bmj.com/content/2/4/189

[ii] Morris MC, Wang Y, Barnes LL, et al. Nutrients and bioactives in green leafy vegetables and cognitive declineNeurology. Published online December 20 2017

[iii] https://www.bhf.org.uk/